Bookshelf

Inspiration:

Letters to Sam:  A Grandfather’s Lessons on Love, Loss, and the Gifts of Life by Daniel Gottlieb

Thinking in Pictures by Temple Grandin

Autism Information:

Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism

What I Wish I’d Known About Raising a Child with Autism by Bobbi Sheahan and Kathy DeOrnellas, PH.D

Early Intervention Games by Barbara Sher

The Way I See It:  A Personal Look at Autism and Asperger’s by Temple Grandin

Motivate to Communicate:  300 Games and Activities for Your Child with Autism

Autism Education and Awareness

In His Shoes:  A Short Journey Through Autism by Joanna L. Keating-Velasco

Fiction:

(Children’s) Nobody’s Perfect by Marlee Matlin and Doug Cooney

(YA) The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon

(YA) Al Capone Does My Shirts by Gennifer Choldenko

(YA) Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine

(YA) Anything But Typical by Nora Raleigh Baskin

(YA) Rules by Cynthia Lord

A Wild Ride Up the Cupboards by Ann Bauer

Wish by Melina Gerosa Bellows

Dark Eye by William Bernhardt

For Whom the Minivan Rolls by Jeffrey Cohen

Daniel Isn’t Talking by Marti Leimbach

The Speed of Dark by Elizabeth Moon

7 thoughts on “Bookshelf

  1. I recommend some books also:
    Changing the course of Autism, by Dr Brian Jepson.
    Healing and recovering Autism, by Jenny Mc Carthy and Dr Jerry Kartinzel.
    Gut and Psychology syndrome by Dr Natasha Campbell Mc Bride.
    Improving the quality of life for children on the Autistic spectrum by Jon and Polly Tommey.
    XXX

  2. Saw your blog featured and stopped by. I review a lot of PB, MG and YA books on autism, some you’ve mentioned. There is Canadian YA author you may way to check out, Beverley Brenna. She’s written a series about an 18-year-old girl in the autism spectrum transitioning into adulthood: Wild Orchid, Waiting for No One, and White Bicycle (not released yet).

    Peter Reynolds has written a wonderful PB, “I’m Here,” that is about an autistic child, but could be any shy child.

    And, I found Tom Fields-Meyer’s “Following Ezra” 2011, the best book written for parents. For years he tried to “fix his son, until one day he realized that it was important to love, accept and follow his son because he had a lot to learn from Ezra.

    Enjoyed your blog.

    Patricia

  3. I Love it that you have these books listed. Its my little reminder to read them. I loved The Way I see it by Temple Grandin. I read the book in a day, I couldn’t put it down. It just explanined so much about my son, who doesn’t talk, that I never knew!

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