Immeasurable Gifts

My beloved Daddy and Callum at his 3rd birthday party.  Taken a few weeks before his passing.

My beloved Daddy and Callum at his 3rd birthday party. Taken a few weeks before his passing.

Today, I am guest posting over at Childswork/Childsplay.  Please visit me there by clicking “Continued”.  :)

On the day after Thanksgiving, I threw myself into Christmas.  I woke up my husband early and insisted he go and get the tree and ornaments out of storage.  It is our first Christmas in our new home, so I was determined to make it a good one.  It is awfully hard to not have fun decorating with little ones.  I loved every minute of it.

But for all the tree-trimming and elf-on-the-shelf fun, this year it is bittersweet.  It is the first Christmas without my beloved daddy, who died in May.  Daddy loved Christmas.  He was one of those rare people who get the true spirit of the season.  He whistled Christmas tunes everywhere he went and put up tacky decorations everywhere just for the joy of it.  He couldn’t care less about gifts.

Continued…

3 thoughts on “Immeasurable Gifts

  1. Margaret

    Your dad sounds wonderful.It’s kind of ironic, because I’m not addicted to facebook either…but last night, before bed I posted that I was thinking of all those who would spend this Christmas with a gaping hole, left by a loved one who passed away this year. Leigh, you are part of my “way too long list” of people…but I wish you Peace, and Hope, and Joy this first Christmas Season without your daddy for unconditional love and acceptance. I truly believe he’s still around. But after 27 Christmases since my Dad passed, I still miss his big bear hugs and his booming voice. Keep his memory alive by sharing with your kids things their grandpa would’ve said/thought/done …and enjoy how he lives on in their looks, their quirks, their laughs, or whatever it may be. Peace be with you!

  2. Janine S. Velasquez

    Another great post. We also lost dad/grandad this past year so together we share the “one less chair at the table” syndrome. While my dad was often bewildered by our son, and far less accepting, he did often present insights to behaviors and “stimming” that we in our youth and inexperience could not fathom. While the memories are bitter sweet, they always let me know that dad, all dads, will live in our hearts forever. Thanks again.

  3. Kathleen Climpson

    Marvelling at your insight so soon after such a great loss. Your Dad was wise in realizing that Callum is happy. We are the ones struggling with acceptance and noticing that our child is content. Gift giving is a part of that learning and acceptance process. My family has chuckled with some of the requests I have made on behalf of my son, but followed through accordingly. ex: upgraded level of a cash register for my 14 year old, he loves money and pretending he is waiting on patrons! Thanks for your thoughts and vulnerability.

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